prostheticknowledge:

Motion Silhouette

Japanese childrens book that features pop-up shapes to cast shadows for the reader to bring motion to its story - video embedded below:

(Google Translation:)

This book is his second picture book that changes its shape depending on the environment.

I will begin to talk about the story and illustrations shadow falls on top of the page overlap. In this work, you can enjoy the animation of shadow phantasmagoric by you move the light. Trees and become bigger and bigger, which aims to train a distant star. Story that changes depending on the page falling shadows, shadows move around the top of the page.

Please enjoy the silhouette meaning and shape change in various ways.

You can find out more at the motion-silhouette Tumblr page here

kyoutaro-hayashiman:

尊敬する二人の作品の映像を作らせて頂きました。


motion-silhouette:

MOTION SILHOUETTE
motion-silhouette.tumblr.com
Designer,Illustrator:megumi kajiwara megumikajiwara.tumblr.com
Designer,book bind:Tatsuhiko Niijima tn-bookshelf.tumblr.com
Movie Director:Kyotaro Hayashi kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com
Music:Ryu Matsuyama ryumatsuyama.com

kyoutaro-hayashiman:

尊敬する二人のためにメイキングを制作しました。

motion-silhouette:

MOTION SILHOUETTE MAKING
motion-silhouette.tumblr.com

Designer,Illustrator:megumi kajiwara megumikajiwara.tumblr.com
Designer,book bind:Tatsuhiko Niijima tn-bookshelf.tumblr.com
Movie Director:Kyotaro Hayashi kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com
Music:Ryu Matsuyama ryumatsuyama.com

(kyoutaro-hayashimanから)

kyoutaro-hayashiman:

http://kyotarohayashi.500px.com

THE BED ROOM TAPE「くじら feat. 奇妙礼太郎(Kujira feat. Kimyo Reitaro)」【Official Music Video】

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5rf-fA9Ipo

Director/Camera: Kyotaro Hayashi 
2nd Camera: Yutaka Obara 
Digital Imaging Technician: Hiroyuki Watanabe 
Production Assistant: Mei Koizumi 
Dress Designer: Canako Inoue 
Hair & Make/Stylist: Yukiko Sumi 
Cast: Kiriko Nagumo 
Making Camera: Rakutaro Hagiwara 
Producer: Takashi Ueno, Koji Karatsu 
Cordinator: Mizue Kawamura

Director/Camera: Kyotaro Hayashi
2nd Camera: Yutaka Obara
Digital Imaging Technician: Hiroyuki Watanabe
Production Assistant: Mei Koizumi
Dress Designer: Canako Inoue
Hair & Make/Stylist: Yukiko Sumi
Cast: Kiriko Nagumo
Making Camera: Rakutaro Hagiwara
Producer: Takashi Ueno, Koji Karatsu
Cordinator: Mizue Kawamura

Thinking Better
Ryu Matsuyama ryumatsuyama.com

・Director : Kyotaro Hayashi kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com
・Model : Jiyeon Luxia Kang
・Bubble artists : Mei Koizumi meikoizumi.com
・Textile designer : kanako inoue canako-inoue.tumblr.com

photoworks 

canako-inoue:

THE CITY PAINTED BY EGON SHIELE

(2011)

-

エゴン・シーレの描いた『街』の絵画が好きだ。

絵画にある奥行きをテキスタイルに落としこむ事を考え、

ドローイングした筆跡をそのまま図案におこしシルクスクリーンでプリント。

白い部分は綿を溶かすオパール加工を施し、光に透ける。

-

material : cotton/polyester

technique : silk screen print/opal processing

photo : Kyoutaro Hayashi

model : Ari Matsuguma / Kazuya Shioi

canako-inoue:

海を眺める

I see the ocean

(2012)

-

material : polyester

technique : transcription print / dying / oridinal technique

photo : Kyoutaro Hayashi

model : Ari Matsuguma

(sankaku18から)

Gyeongbokgung
Gyeongbokgung was built three years after the Joseon Dynasty was founded and it served as its main palace. With Mount Bugaksan as a backdrop and the Street of Six Ministries (today’s Sejongno) outsideGwanghwamun Gate, the main entrance to the palace, Gyeongbokgung was situated in the heart of the Korean capital city. It was steadily expanded before being reduced to ashes during the Japanese invasion of 1592. For the next 273 years the palace grounds were left derelict until being rebuilt in 1867 under the leadership of Prince Regent Heungseon Daewongun. The restoration was completed on a grand scale, with 330 buildings crowded together in a labyrinthine configuration. Within the palace walls were the Outer Court (oejeon), offices for the king and state officials, and the Inner Court (naejeon), which included living quarters for the royal family as well as gardens for leisure. Within its extensive precincts were other palaces, large and small, including Junggung (the Queen`s residence) and Donggung (the Crown prince’s residence).
Owing to its status as the symbol of national sovereignty, Gyeongbokgung was demolished during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century. In 1911, ownership of land at the palace was transferred to the Japanese Governor-General. In 1915, on the pretext of holding an exhibition, more than 90% of the buildings were torn down. Following the exhibition the Japanese leveled whatever still remained and built their colonial headquarters, the Government-General Building (1916–26), on the site.
Restoration of Gyeongbokgung to its former glory has been ongoing since 1990. The Government-General Building was removed in 1996 and Heungnyemun Gate (2001) and Gwanghwamun Gate (2006-2010) were reconstructed in their original locations and forms. Reconstructions of the Inner Court and Crown Prince’s residence have also been completed.

Gyeongbokgung

Gyeongbokgung was built three years after the Joseon Dynasty was founded and it served as its main palace. With Mount Bugaksan as a backdrop and the Street of Six Ministries (today’s Sejongno) outsideGwanghwamun Gate, the main entrance to the palace, Gyeongbokgung was situated in the heart of the Korean capital city. It was steadily expanded before being reduced to ashes during the Japanese invasion of 1592. For the next 273 years the palace grounds were left derelict until being rebuilt in 1867 under the leadership of Prince Regent Heungseon Daewongun. The restoration was completed on a grand scale, with 330 buildings crowded together in a labyrinthine configuration. Within the palace walls were the Outer Court (oejeon), offices for the king and state officials, and the Inner Court (naejeon), which included living quarters for the royal family as well as gardens for leisure. Within its extensive precincts were other palaces, large and small, including Junggung (the Queen`s residence) and Donggung (the Crown prince’s residence).

Owing to its status as the symbol of national sovereignty, Gyeongbokgung was demolished during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century. In 1911, ownership of land at the palace was transferred to the Japanese Governor-General. In 1915, on the pretext of holding an exhibition, more than 90% of the buildings were torn down. Following the exhibition the Japanese leveled whatever still remained and built their colonial headquarters, the Government-General Building (1916–26), on the site.

Restoration of Gyeongbokgung to its former glory has been ongoing since 1990. The Government-General Building was removed in 1996 and Heungnyemun Gate (2001) and Gwanghwamun Gate (2006-2010) were reconstructed in their original locations and forms. Reconstructions of the Inner Court and Crown Prince’s residence have also been completed.

Oral:phabet

artists:takayuki ogawa

http://tamagraph2013.net/artists.html

photo:kyoutaro hayashi

http://kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com

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