Thinking Better
Ryu Matsuyama ryumatsuyama.com

・Director : Kyotaro Hayashi kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com
・Model : Jiyeon Luxia Kang
・Bubble artists : Mei Koizumi meikoizumi.com
・Textile designer : kanako inoue canako-inoue.tumblr.com

photoworks 

canako-inoue:

THE CITY PAINTED BY EGON SHIELE

(2011)

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エゴン・シーレの描いた『街』の絵画が好きだ。

絵画にある奥行きをテキスタイルに落としこむ事を考え、

ドローイングした筆跡をそのまま図案におこしシルクスクリーンでプリント。

白い部分は綿を溶かすオパール加工を施し、光に透ける。

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material : cotton/polyester

technique : silk screen print/opal processing

photo : Kyoutaro Hayashi

model : Ari Matsuguma / Kazuya Shioi

canako-inoue:

海を眺める

I see the ocean

(2012)

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material : polyester

technique : transcription print / dying / oridinal technique

photo : Kyoutaro Hayashi

model : Ari Matsuguma

(sankaku18から)

Gyeongbokgung
Gyeongbokgung was built three years after the Joseon Dynasty was founded and it served as its main palace. With Mount Bugaksan as a backdrop and the Street of Six Ministries (today’s Sejongno) outsideGwanghwamun Gate, the main entrance to the palace, Gyeongbokgung was situated in the heart of the Korean capital city. It was steadily expanded before being reduced to ashes during the Japanese invasion of 1592. For the next 273 years the palace grounds were left derelict until being rebuilt in 1867 under the leadership of Prince Regent Heungseon Daewongun. The restoration was completed on a grand scale, with 330 buildings crowded together in a labyrinthine configuration. Within the palace walls were the Outer Court (oejeon), offices for the king and state officials, and the Inner Court (naejeon), which included living quarters for the royal family as well as gardens for leisure. Within its extensive precincts were other palaces, large and small, including Junggung (the Queen`s residence) and Donggung (the Crown prince’s residence).
Owing to its status as the symbol of national sovereignty, Gyeongbokgung was demolished during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century. In 1911, ownership of land at the palace was transferred to the Japanese Governor-General. In 1915, on the pretext of holding an exhibition, more than 90% of the buildings were torn down. Following the exhibition the Japanese leveled whatever still remained and built their colonial headquarters, the Government-General Building (1916–26), on the site.
Restoration of Gyeongbokgung to its former glory has been ongoing since 1990. The Government-General Building was removed in 1996 and Heungnyemun Gate (2001) and Gwanghwamun Gate (2006-2010) were reconstructed in their original locations and forms. Reconstructions of the Inner Court and Crown Prince’s residence have also been completed.

Gyeongbokgung

Gyeongbokgung was built three years after the Joseon Dynasty was founded and it served as its main palace. With Mount Bugaksan as a backdrop and the Street of Six Ministries (today’s Sejongno) outsideGwanghwamun Gate, the main entrance to the palace, Gyeongbokgung was situated in the heart of the Korean capital city. It was steadily expanded before being reduced to ashes during the Japanese invasion of 1592. For the next 273 years the palace grounds were left derelict until being rebuilt in 1867 under the leadership of Prince Regent Heungseon Daewongun. The restoration was completed on a grand scale, with 330 buildings crowded together in a labyrinthine configuration. Within the palace walls were the Outer Court (oejeon), offices for the king and state officials, and the Inner Court (naejeon), which included living quarters for the royal family as well as gardens for leisure. Within its extensive precincts were other palaces, large and small, including Junggung (the Queen`s residence) and Donggung (the Crown prince’s residence).

Owing to its status as the symbol of national sovereignty, Gyeongbokgung was demolished during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century. In 1911, ownership of land at the palace was transferred to the Japanese Governor-General. In 1915, on the pretext of holding an exhibition, more than 90% of the buildings were torn down. Following the exhibition the Japanese leveled whatever still remained and built their colonial headquarters, the Government-General Building (1916–26), on the site.

Restoration of Gyeongbokgung to its former glory has been ongoing since 1990. The Government-General Building was removed in 1996 and Heungnyemun Gate (2001) and Gwanghwamun Gate (2006-2010) were reconstructed in their original locations and forms. Reconstructions of the Inner Court and Crown Prince’s residence have also been completed.

Oral:phabet

artists:takayuki ogawa

http://tamagraph2013.net/artists.html

photo:kyoutaro hayashi

http://kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com

form giving piano

Ryu Matsuyama Collaborate with HAKUSHI™

動き、形から想像する音。音の中から創造する動き、形。プログラム制御のみ論理的な図ではなく、より気持ちのよい感覚的共感を追求しました。

The sound Imagined from form. The movements and shapes created from sound.I sought not only logical images controlled by the program but also a more pleasant feeling sympathy.

salgu-leeminyoung:

Scrumble intersection Shibuya station Ginza intersection Iriomote Hoshizuna beach.

Three intersections, each with a set of matching kaleidoscope-patterned umbrellas. 

Three video recordings of people holding the umbrellas and crossing the intersections. 

 

An intersection is a place where encounters and separations are repeated indefinitely. Similarly, in a kaleidoscope, objects adhere or separate with each change in position; change is continuous, without the same image appearing again. Each of these beautiful moments became an individual umbrella.

 

The number of the umbrellas is the same as the number of the objects in the kaleidoscope.

People holding the umbrellas and walking across the intersection link to the patterns from the kaleidoscope that creates different patterns from diverse figures of the objects.

The reason for choosing the umbrella is that the angle of the umbrella rib is the same as the angle of the two mirrors in the kaleidoscope, which is 22.5 degrees.

Also the pattern shown from a tiny hole becomes a large umbrella that creates a space that covers me.

 

Umbrellas…

The umbrellas are made of 100% polyester, however different fabrics are used depending on the places.

 

Heat-transfer printing, water repellent technique.

Number of umbrellas 182.

Shibuya 52, Ginza 61 and Iriomote Island 70.

55cm umbrellas with 8 ribs made of FRP, handle made of rubber urethane.

 

Kaleidoscopes…

Different density of oil to differentiate the speed of each place.

形を覚えて色を感じ数を数えて名を覚える教科書


小さな子どもの本はどれもかわいらしく、

どうしても絵を見ることに夢中になってしまう。

それで良いと思う。

しかし、子供用の絵本にも大人が手にしても良いような

思わず手に取りたくなるような写真集としても

見ることの出来る物になったも良いのではないか。

そのような子ども専用ではなく、

インテリアとしても置くことの出来る写真集のような

教科書をめざして制作しました。

Designer : Haruka Hashimoto

model : Rina Nishimura

photographer : Kyoutaro Hayashi

Designer : Haruka Hashimoto

model : Rina Nishimura

photographer : Kyoutaro Hayashi

ABCD: Alternative Ballet Customizer & Dictionary


To be exhibited at Musashino Art University
Jan.17th, Thurs. – 20th, Sun. 2013

motion design, direction: Kyoutaro Hayashi
direction, rotoscope animation: Ayae Takise
dancer: Megumi Higa
music: “Trepak (Russian Dance)” from The Nutcracker Suite by P.Tschaikovsky

ジュエリークレヨン
子どもが道路に絵を描く。
その感じで大きな紙に自由に描いてほしい
そんなイメージから作りました。
林響太朗→
http://kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com/
http://www.facebook.com/kyoutaro.hayashi
http://kyotarohayashi.500px.com/
宮本厚樹→
http://attyannnooheya.tumblr.com/
http://www.facebook.com/atsuki.miyamoto

ジュエリークレヨン

子どもが道路に絵を描く。

その感じで大きな紙に自由に描いてほしい

そんなイメージから作りました。

林響太朗→

http://kyoutaro-works.tumblr.com/

http://www.facebook.com/kyoutaro.hayashi

http://kyotarohayashi.500px.com/

宮本厚樹→

http://attyannnooheya.tumblr.com/

http://www.facebook.com/atsuki.miyamoto

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